Issue Cover image

You need to login to your IAA account in order to access jounral PDFs.
Member Login
logo

Freshwater Crayfish 19(1): 69-75 (2013)

PEER REVIEWED    RESEARCH ARTICLE

Download: PDF (26.7 Mb)

The movement patterns of Austropotamobius torrentium and Astacus astacus: Is a stony step a barrier?

Římalová-Kadlecová K and Bílý M  e-mail link

Published Online: 2/15/2013

Abstract

Austropotamobius torrentium (Schrank) and Astacus astacus (Linnaeus) are endangered crayfish species in Europe. They are currently being excluded from their original localities by non-native crayfish species, which are often causal agents of the spread of crayfish plague and also competitors with native crayfish species. Artificial barriers represent one option for halting the spread of non-native crayfish species. In Bzovský Stream (Czech Republic, Central Bohemia) the streambed contains stony steps placed to decrease the flow of water. Two stony steps (60 cm and 110 cm high) were evaluated as a movement barrier for crayfish. At the area of confluence of Bzovský and Stroupinský streams, 1887 crayfish were marked with a visible implanted elastomer, whereas 56 crayfish were recaptured or marked in Bzovský Stream. In a four-year mark-recapture study, we showed that A. torrentium was able to cross a step 60 cm high and that both A. torrentium and A. astacus were able to cross a perpendicular stony step 110 cm high. These results show that these stony steps do not act as strong movement barriers for crayfish in streams. However, the ability of crayfish to move across a concrete barrier appears to depend on the design of the barrier.

Supplemental Documents

  • There are no supplementary documents for this article

CrossRef Logo

Cited By

0 Citations:

How to Cite

Římalová-Kadlecová K and Bílý M. (2013). The movement patterns of Austropotamobius torrentium and Astacus astacus: Is a stony step a barrier?. Freshwater Crayfish 19(1):69-75. doi: 10.5869/fc.2013.v19.069

 

 

Author Information

Michal  Bílý, Department of Ecology, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcká 129, Prague, Prague 6 - Suchdol, Czech Republic165 21. E-mail: bily@vuv.cz

Katerina  Rímalová,* Department of Ecology, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcká 129, Prague, Prague 6 - Suchdol, Czech Republic165 21. E-mail: katerina.rimalova@seznam.cz

Corresponding Author indicated by an *.

 

Publication History

   Manuscript Submitted: 9/6/2012

   Manuscript Accepted: 1/24/2013

   Published Online: 2/15/2013

   Published in Print: 2/15/2013

 

 

Funding Information

No specific funding statement is available for this article.

 

 



 

 

 

Member Login

Forgot Your Password?

Recover PW

Enter the e-mail address you used to
create your IAA account.
Return to Login
Back to Top