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Freshwater Crayfish 21(1): 123-130 (2015)

PEER REVIEWED    RESEARCH ARTICLE

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Life history and distribution of the Oconee burrowing crayfish, Cambarus truncatus

Roberson EK, Skelton CE and Babb CM  e-mail link

Published Online: 12/31/2015

Abstract

The Oconee burrowing crayfish, Cambarus truncatus, is endemic to the Oconee River watershed in central Georgia. Very little is known about this primary burrower’s life history or distribution. To gather life history data, a non-invasive study was conducted using Norrocky burrowing crayfish traps and burrowing crayfish nets at Balls Ferry State Park in Toomsboro, Georgia. Crayfish were captured, measured, tagged, and released to determine growth rate, reproductive stage, and association with physiochemical factors. Thirty-six specimens were captured during the study of which twenty-five were tagged and released. Ten of the individuals were recaptured multiple times. Form I males were found in the months of February, March, May, October, and November. Female glair gland activity was present from February – May, when four in-berry females were captured; females held an average of 28 eggs. Glair gland activity peaked again during the months of October and November. Cambarus truncatus exhibited a growth rate of about 1 mm in total carapace length per molt until plateauing at about 34 mm total carapace length. The largest specimen collected was a female measuring 34.6 mm in total carapace length. The known distribution of C. truncatus was increased from 15 to 26 localities during this study, and now encompasses six counties within the Oconee River watershed.

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How to Cite

Roberson EK, Skelton CE and Babb CM. (2015). Life history and distribution of the Oconee burrowing crayfish, Cambarus truncatus. Freshwater Crayfish 21(1):123-130. doi: 10.5869/fc.2015.v21-1.123

 

 

Author Information

Ethan K. Roberson,* Biological and Environmental Sciences, Georgia College & State University, 231 W. Hancock St, Milledgeville, Georgia, United States31061. E-mail: eroberson1011@gmail.com

Christopher E. Skelton, Biological and Environmental Sciences, Georgia College & State University, 231 W. Hancock St, Milledgeville, Georgia, United States31061. E-mail: chris.skelton@gcsu.edu

Christopher M. Babb, Biological and Environmental Sciences, Georgia College & State University, 231 W. Hancock St, Milledgeville, Georgia, United States31061. E-mail: christopher.babb@bobcats.gcsu.edu

Corresponding Author indicated by an *.

 

Publication History

   Manuscript Submitted: 8/26/2015

   Manuscript Accepted: 12/1/2015

   Published Online: 12/31/2015

   Published in Print: 12/31/2015

 

 

Funding Information

No specific funding statement is available for this article.

 

 



 

 

 

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